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    Mixed Pictures at MIss Muffet Pre-Primary

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    Mixed pictures at Miss Muffet Pre-Primary

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    Grade R & Miss Muffet Pre-Primary Port Elizabeth.

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    Why Kids Have Tantrums

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    Temper tantrums range from whining and crying to screaming, kicking, hitting, and breath holding.

    They’re equally common in boys and girls and usually occur between the ages of 1 to 3.

    Kids’ temperaments vary dramatically — so some kids may experience regular tantrums, whereas others have them rarely. They’re a normal part of development and don’t have to be seen as something negative. Unlike adults, kids don’t have the same inhibitions or control.

    Imagine how it feels when you’re determined to program your DVD player and aren’t able to do it, no matter how hard you try, because you can’t understand how. It’s pretty frustrating — do you swear, throw the manual, walk away, and slam the door on your way out? That’s the adult version of a tantrum. Toddlers are also trying to master their world and when they aren’t able to accomplish a task, they turn to one of the only tools at their disposal for venting frustration — a tantrum.

    Several basic causes of tantrums are familiar to parents everywhere: The child is seeking attention or is tired, hungry, or uncomfortable. In addition, tantrums are often the result of kids’ frustration with the world — they can’t get something (for example, an object or a parent) to do what they want. Frustration is an unavoidable part of their lives as they learn how people, objects, and their own bodies work.

    Tantrums are common during the second year of life, a time when children are acquiring language. Toddlers generally understand more than they can express. Imagine not being able to communicate your needs to someone — a frustrating experience that may precipitate a tantrum. As language skills improve, tantrums tend to decrease.

    Another task toddlers are faced with is an increasing need for autonomy. Toddlers want a sense of independence and control over the environment — more than they may be capable of handling. This creates the perfect condition for power struggles as a child thinks “I can do it myself” or “I want it, give it to me.” When kids discover that they can’t do it and can’t have everything they want, the stage is set for a tantrum.

    Avoiding Tantrums

    The best way to deal with temper tantrums is to avoid them in the first place, whenever possible. Here are some strategies that may help:

    • Make sure your child isn’t acting up simply because he or she isn’t getting enough attention. Although this is hard to imagine, to a child, negative attention (a parent’s response to a tantrum) is better than no attention at all. Many studies show that any attention, including negative attention, results in an increase in that behavior! Try to establish a habit of catching your child being good (“time in”), which means rewarding your little one with attention for positive behavior. Even just commenting on what they’re doing whenever toddlers aren’t having a tantrum can help increase those positive behaviors.
    • Try to give toddlers some control over little things. This may fulfill the need for independence and ward off tantrums. Offer minor choices such as “Do you want orange juice or apple juice?” or “Do you want to brush your teeth before or after taking a bath?” This way, you aren’t asking “Do you want to brush your teeth now?” — which inevitably will be answered “no.”
    • Keep off-limits objects out of sight and out of reach to make struggles less likely to develop over them. Obviously, this isn’t always possible, especially outside of the home where the environment can’t be controlled.
    • Distract your child. Take advantage of your little one’s short attention span by offering a replacement for the coveted object or beginning a new activity to replace the frustrating or forbidden one. Or simply change the environment. Take your toddler outside or inside or move to a different room.
    • Set the stage for success when kids are playing or trying to master a new task. Offer age-appropriate toys and games. Also, start with something simple before moving on to more challenging tasks.
    • Consider the request carefully when your child wants something. Is it outrageous? Maybe it isn’t. Choose your battles; accommodate when you can.
    • Know your child’s limits. If you know your toddler is tired, it’s not the best time to go grocery shopping or try to squeeze in one more errand.
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